The Saskatchewan RCMP has joined both Alberta and Saskatchewan in implementing Clare’s Law, a protective law against domestic violence.

The law, in place now, gives a person who is concerned they may be a victim of violence from either a current or former partner to apply to know more about a potential violent past with others.

Some third-party individuals with a close personal relationship with the person at risk can also apply on behalf of that person. The RCMP says providing this information can assist them in making informed decisions about their safety, the safety of a loved one, and the relationship.

Each request for information made under Clare’s Law is considered on a case-by-case basis and information relating to a request is reviewed by an established committee consisting of police services, Victims Services and The Provincial Association of Transition Houses and Services of Saskatchewan.

The RCMP in Saskatchewan previously enacted some of Clare’s Law rules but had to make changes over the last ten months, because they didn’t have some authorities for disclosing personal information, as per Section 8 of the Privacy Act.

During the time when the RCMP had to work with the Office of the Privacy Commissioner and Federal and Provincial governments,  stopgap measures were set up for victims to receive support. Now, new sections to the RCMP Regulations allow for the Saskatchewan RCMP’s participation in Clare’s Law.

Chief Superintendent Alfredo Bangloy, the acting commanding officer in the province, says that Saskatchewan was the first province to implement Clare’s Law, and the RCMP is committed to supporting those facing violence in relationships, intimate partner violence and gender-based violence.

Provincial Association of Transition Houses and Services of Saskatchewan adds that this will be a big step, especially in rural and remote areas of Saskatchewan to protect these victims of violence.

The Alberta Government also put it in place Thursday as well.